Wednesday, March 5, 2014

resonanceinthehalls:

Completely addicted to Live’s Throwing Copper at the moment, especially this song. So excellent and I get so excited when I hear this album, it’s like energy on tape aaaah

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

blackpaint20:

Salomé by Federico Ribas 1918

blackpaint20:

Salomé by Federico Ribas 1918

antipahtico:

Mildred Davis ~ Haunted Spooks (1920)

(Source: unchainmesister)

fleurdulys:

Satiated Siren - Gustav Adolf Mossa
1905

fleurdulys:

Satiated Siren - Gustav Adolf Mossa

1905

weirdtalesmagazine:

Joe Jusko
Tuesday, March 4, 2014

cas-get-into-my-ass:

“Leo had slammed his hand on the table countless times and he moved his hand further and he crushed a crystal cordial glass. Blood was dripping down his hand. He never broke character. He kept going. He was in such a zone. It was very intense. He required stitches.”

I think the most impressive thing about this is that last face he makes is a spot on Quentin Tarantino impression.

(Source: its-blee)

blue-system:

Light and Dark by smokey lace on Flickr.
This is not so much a mask, but just a straight up ram head. I like it #payday2

This is not so much a mask, but just a straight up ram head. I like it #payday2

"In secret on those
rare occasions
when no living soul was near
no eyes, no ears
no other people
were around to see or hear
so there was no danger of some chance intruder
to doubt his manliness and strength
then suddenly his words grew gentler,
and his gestures slightly changed”

Do you know how much I love this song? It’s like the perfect song.

(Source: Spotify)

sydneyflapper:

This clipping from New Zealand’s The Evening Post of 9 September 1913 gives us a fascinating look into the evolution of the word “flapper”. At first glance noting - as this article does - the “disappearance” of the flapper in 1913 is hilariously premature…the flapper as we understand the term today didn’t come into her own until the 1920s, although the word has much earlier origins. Reading on, however, it becomes apparent that this is the earlier incarnation of the flapper - the sort of in-between girl, the teen who is in between adolescence and adulthood, believed to be rather gawky and awkward (“flapper dresses” were advertised in the 1910s as loosefitting gowns suitable to someone in this intermediate stage).

The article tells us that the flapper has supposedly been replaced by “a generation of modern minxes, confident, brazen, and eager to startle their men friends by their openness of speech.” Further, they are notable for “a pandemonium of powder, a riot of rouge, and moral anarchy of dress” according to critics, but a supporter notes “complaints of the manners, behaviour, and the dress of young girls of to-day simply mean, in the opinion of a New York writer, that the English girl has become like her American sister— a splendid, reliable young person, possessing individuality of mind, and amply able to take care of her young sweet self.”

It was these very characteristics that the term “flapper” evolved to characterize.

sydneyflapper:

This clipping from New Zealand’s The Evening Post of 9 September 1913 gives us a fascinating look into the evolution of the word “flapper”. At first glance noting - as this article does - the “disappearance” of the flapper in 1913 is hilariously premature…the flapper as we understand the term today didn’t come into her own until the 1920s, although the word has much earlier origins. Reading on, however, it becomes apparent that this is the earlier incarnation of the flapper - the sort of in-between girl, the teen who is in between adolescence and adulthood, believed to be rather gawky and awkward (“flapper dresses” were advertised in the 1910s as loosefitting gowns suitable to someone in this intermediate stage).

The article tells us that the flapper has supposedly been replaced by “a generation of modern minxes, confident, brazen, and eager to startle their men friends by their openness of speech.” Further, they are notable for “a pandemonium of powder, a riot of rouge, and moral anarchy of dress” according to critics, but a supporter notes “complaints of the manners, behaviour, and the dress of young girls of to-day simply mean, in the opinion of a New York writer, that the English girl has become like her American sister— a splendid, reliable young person, possessing individuality of mind, and amply able to take care of her young sweet self.”

It was these very characteristics that the term “flapper” evolved to characterize.